Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Temporal Vacua and Absolute Zero

frankd23 said...
This is a question that I hope some people will answer...I can't figure out how to make my own post because I'm terrible with computers so i figured Id just make a comment on this question. A temporal vacuum is just an area where everything stops changing, and essentially stops moving. I argue in my paper that temporal vacua are just areas where at absolute zero. I feel that the argument is sound unless there is some way for an area to stop moving completely without it being at absolute zero. I have a possible explanation but i still think absolute zero wins in the end. Id' like to hear some of your ideas

8:24 PM

7 Comments:

Blogger mparent said...

A temporal vacuum actually wouldn't have a temperature. We wouldn't be able to measure the temperature but that's only one problem. At absolute zero there is still what's called Brownian motion. Brownian motion is tiny vibrations that every atom has. Without Brownian motion all atoms would actually collapse and we'd be able to store an entire star in a space smaller than a thimble. So basically at absolute zero there is still energy, but none of it is heat enegery. However, in a temporal vacuum none of these changes can even occur, there is no energy change at all because nothing can change in any way. Heat is defined in terms of changing energy but in a temporal vacuum there can be no changing energy so the concept of temperature in a temporal vacuum is meaningless.

6:56 AM  
Blogger Chris Tillman said...

I'm no expert on this, but I thought that as atoms approached absolute zero, Bose-Einstein condensation occurs and atoms really do collapse. Does anybody know if that's right?

6:07 PM  
Blogger mparent said...

That's true, I had forgotten about that. I don't think they collapse though. They kind of merge into one big super atom. I'll do some more research and talk to one of my physics friends and see if they can shed any light on this topic for us.

12:10 PM  
Blogger Kermit said...

I think that in a temporal vacuum, there could be no temperature because particles would have no kinetic energy becuase they couldn't move. But I wonder if an object at absolute zero would be similar to one in a temporal vacuum. I also wonder what would happen to all of the energy in the world in a temporal vacuum. If an object is falling from a tall building and all of a sudden, time stopped, what would happen? Would it stop falling? Would there still be gravity? I think it would just freeze and stop gaining kinetic energy, although at the time it would have no potential energy either because it wouldn't be physically able to continue falling.

5:00 PM  
Blogger Hawaii said...

I think that the absence of energy in a system doesn't necessarily denote a lack of time. Assuming that reaching absolute zero is metaphysically possible (and I'm not sure that it is), then shouldn't time slow down in a vicinity as it approaches absolute zero? If absolute zero and temporal vacua are one and the same, then the rate of time should vary proportionally do the temperature. I don't think that this is the case...both astronauts and those on earth seem to have the same time scales. Satellites sent to distant planets also seem to have the same time scales. Without there being any real correlation between temperature and rate of time, then I don't think that we can say that absolute zero and temporal vacuua are the same either. There is no reason to believe as such.

5:47 PM  
Blogger Hawaii said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

5:51 PM  
Blogger Darron said...

I never thought about absolute zero but as a reason for proving temporal vacuums are true but it sounds like a pretty good reasoning for them. Here's an argument to counter the truth of temporal vacuums though..

4. If there have been times where change has resumed after a period of no change, then change occurs at that given moment after a temporal vacuum.
5. If change occurs at that given moment after a temporal vacuum, then there is an explanation, in terms of an immediately preceding change, of why it occurred at precisely that moment and not at some other moment.
6. There is no explanation, in terms of an immediately preceding change, of why it occurred at precisely that moment and not at some other moment.
7. Therefore, change does not occur at that given moment after a temporal vacuum.
8. If change does not occur at that given moment after a temporal vacuum, then there is no reasoning why change started at that moment.
9. If there is no reason why change started at that moment, then there is no reason why changed stopped.
10. If there is no reason why change stopped, then there is no reasoning for a temporal vacuum.
11. Therefore, there is no reasoning for a temporal vacuum.
12. Therefore, temporal vacuums are not logical.

10:05 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home